Bromont House by Paul Bernier Architecte

Bromont House by Paul Bernier Architecte

Architects: Paul Bernier Architecte
Photography: James Brittain
Location: Bromont, Canada

Located near Bromont, Québec (Canada) and surrounded by woods, the Bromont House is set in a natural clearing atop a rocky outcrop. The site offers beautiful views of the forest. In winter, when the leaves have fallen, the Appalachian Mountains are visible in the distance. This project, a weekend getaway for a couple living in Montreal, set out to provide a serene, light-filled and timeless space that would be sensitive to its natural setting.

The house is made up of 2 volumes, a day block and a night block.

The day block is a U-shaped volume set on a plateau at the top of the outcrop. It houses the shared living spaces, including the kitchen, the dining room, the living room and a reading nook, which is tucked behind the fireplace. The facades on the outside of this U-shape are clad in natural stone and pierced by openings that frame prime views. Floor to ceiling windows line the inside of the U and define a sheltered inner courtyard.

The night block, which includes the master bedroom, consists of a 2-storey stone block that extends over the slope. Here, too, openings have been oriented and sized as a function of the vistas and the sun’s path. A generous window wraps around the southeast corner, for instance, to afford a stunning diagonal view over the woods.

These 2 volumes are connected by a veranda and a fully glazed passageway.

A large roof with an exposed timber frame of Douglas fir covers the entire house. Inside, the sense of a single volume is reinforced by the open space beneath the ceiling, with no partition extending to full height. Rooms that require privacy, like the bathroom in the day block, are capped by low ceilings that set them off as cubes within the space. The bathroom wall, which faces the inner courtyard, is a pivoting screen of frosted glass and steel. This feature ensures the optimal use of natural light and reinforces the notion of a fluid relationship between the spaces.

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